Thursday, December 17, 2009

Photos - $250 Mauser Broomhandles!

There was this company on AuctionArms called OysterBay Industries (their screen name was OBI or something), apparently years ago they were an importer of Broomhandles and they made detachable magazines for Broomhandles (and modified their frames).  I bought this one for $250.  It looked okay in the pictures, but was worse in person.  I still think it's shootable, though!


  I began by removing the grips.  They were crusty and disintegrated immediately.  The grip frame was pretty nasty with heavy pitting.  I'm surprised how thin they are.  I feel like they would break off if I dropped the gun.  Actually that would be kinda neat if I could replace the grips with an AR-15 pistol grip.  Next I stripped the 'upper' from the grip frame (the barrel and upper receiver are actually one piece and cannot be separated)  I didn't wanna take apart the fire control group just yet, because I was afraid they would break or I'd loose some pieces.  I let the metal parts soak in brake cleaner for a few days.
TO BE CONTINUED!!!


Saturday, September 12, 2009

AR-15 Finished


Here's the AR-15.  Parts rundown:
  • .223 bull barrel 24" - $200
  • DPMS Bolt+Carrier+Charge handle - ~$150
  • Del-Ton Lower - $225 (yes, I paid that much, dammit!)
  • DPMS (and some Olympic parts) Lower Parts - ~$70
  • DPMS Upper + Parts  - $145
  • Float Tube - $50
  • A1 Butt Stock - $30

Total - $870.  Not exactly saving money by building your own rifle during the current situation, but at least I learned how the thing functions.  I don't think it was possible to buy a complete rifle for less than $600 in the past nine months but that's how much much a mix-'n-match like this is supposed to sell for.   The 14X Scope (BSA) and Riser+5" Extension (Yankee Hill Machinery) cost $35 and $20 and I already had these two lying around so I didn't factor them into the total cost. I haven't had a chance to fire it and I don't think I want to.  I think I may end up selling the upper since I already have a nice .223 T/C Contender Carbine.  I didn't realize I wasted so much money on this 'till JUST NOW.

Monday, August 24, 2009

Video - BossTeam100

So I spent the summer in Maryland.  My cousin was obsessing over some video on Youtube depicting some guys wearing ridiculous shoes and gold chains getting on a bus.  While at the boardwalk at Ocean City he had the idea that we should make our own.  SO IT WAS DECIDED - thus BossTeam100 was born!


Friday, July 17, 2009

Building an AR-15

Bought a DelTon AR-15 stripped lower at a gun show back in January. It's been five months since I ordered a complete upper + lower parts kit from Delton's website and I'm about done waiting. Last I heard they were still on back order from December. What the hell is going on there? It seems customers are being put on a waiting list even though things are in stock. I canceled my order and just ordered the parts individually from Midway. DPMS seems to be the only company to have anything in stock. You may not be able to order a complete Lower Parts Kit (LPK) but you can order the pieces individually. I decided I wanted shiny buttons on my AR15 so I decided to add that to the shopping cart. The grips are Ajax 1911 pewter grips attached to a '1911 to AR-15' adapter. The left panel seems to get in the way of the safety selector so I guess I'll be going back to A1 grips. The Bling grips can be further adapted to an AK using an "AR-15 to AK-47" adapter, which I will be attaching to my previous AK project.

Anyways, here's the progress so far...


The barrel (not attached yet) is a 24" stainless steel bull barrel.  I found out the hard way that it is incompatible with the M16A1 handguards, which is too bad, because I like the A1 grips/handguards!

Monday, June 22, 2009

AK Final Update

I should point out that since my last update, I did not document the remaining steps required in building this.  Particularly, the hardening of the steel and attaching the barrel and the components together (the most difficult part in my opinion).  I used this http://www.gunsgutsandgod.com as a guide and it should be pretty straight forward.

I guess I'm done with this.  After having it headspace checked, I bolted everything on with some screws and added some JB Weld to keep them from backing out.  The rails are also bolted on (three 6-32 screws each).  I ground the bolts as flat as I could so I could add the safety lever.  I did not use the short screws that came with the Tapco kit on the cross-bolt because I believe that a single 1.5" machine screw (trimmed of course) across the width of the reciever will hold better.  The same with the rear trunnion.    I finished the receiver with a coat of flat black Krylon.  I ordered a UTG m70 "Tactical" handguard from Centerfire systems.  I couldn't find any wooden ones anywhere, and plus I needed a weapon to tack on this box of tactical crap I've acquired over the year.

Monday, May 25, 2009

Hunting at Escondido Ranch

We went hunting for the first time.  Went to a lodge called Escondido Ranch, which is owned by the Navy and run by the 'Morale Welfare and Recreation' department.  When we got there, there were three enlisted navy personal running the place and one elderly gentleman chilling in the lounge watching some Clint Eastwood movies.

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

More bubba-smith links

Do you know why I haven't updated my AK project in over a month? Because that's how lazy I am.  The camera is right there in front of me but I'm too lazy to upload the pictures!

Classic Bubba Thread (Sniper rifle + synthetic stock + 3 pounds of glue).

Monday, April 20, 2009

Friday, March 27, 2009

Building the AK (Part 2) – Folding Flats

Here is my progress so far (actually, I've already finished it, but I thought I'd post my own half-assed tutorial even though there are already some better ones out there).  The first picture shows the rear end of the flat.  The distance between the walls of the AK receiver should be 1.25 inches exactly.  Measure both ends and make sure it's centered and then mark.  It doesn't matter if its off (see lower picture, figure 5), my ak managed to function fine even though it looks like it was beat up by a retarded monkey.  The next step was to get a strip of 1.25 inch metal from home depot.  I drilled holes in it and bolted it to the receiver flat.  NOTE:  There should be a 1.25" strip of metal on the top AND bottom of the flat.  I don't know why the picture shows only one side with a strip of metal.

After bending it by pounding it with a rubber mallet, I put it in a bench vise to squeeze the sides together.  Figure 2 shows the rear trunnion section.  I was trying to sharpen the corners out here.  Figure 3 shows an aluminum block I bought from Harbor Freight.  I found out this works better for sharpening the corners than the method in figure 2.  Figure 4 shows the aluminum block attached to the receiver.  I used a plain old hammer the beat the corners into shape.  Keep making sure the holes line up!  Hammering the edges is your last chance to make any corrections to your receiver if you didn't fold them in the right place.  After you're done, it should look something like this in figure 5.  Next step is to harden the axis pin holes and the ejector rail with a mapp torch.

Sunday, March 1, 2009

Ghetto SVD

I just finished sorting things out with AKParts.com and they've FINALLY sent the package.  I take back everything bad I said about them.  Meanwhile, I ordered an AMD-65 parts kit for 170 dollars at Centerfire systems and by next week I'll have enough parts to build two "frankenstein" AKs.  Until then I shall amuse you with this half-assed plan for a cheap SVD bubba alternative.

The idea came to me as I saw that several online retailers were selling various types of barrels with cut off receiver stubs still attached.  Particularly, they were mostly Nagants, Steyr M95, and SKS.  I figured, these barrels still have the locking mechanisms intact, why couldn't they be utilized somehow?

NOTE: Try not to laugh at my pathetic photoshopping skills.  I only spent five minutes on this.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Building an AK – Ghetto Style (Part 1)

I just started building my AK about a week ago.  The days of $70 parts kits are long gone.  I had to order the major parts individually over the course of the year in order to save money and now I've finally got everything I need and then some.  I'll save you the trouble of searching and show you what you'll need right now in order to build an AK-47 semiautomatic in 7.62X39.

Monday, January 19, 2009

Ghetto Gewehr, MKI

(Yes, in case you're wondering, this is old)

A few years ago, Old Western Scrounger and some other places were selling complete Gewehr 1888 Commission Rifles (minus the bolt and the ever more elusive bolt head) for quite a bargain.  For $65 you could get 7 junk rifles that were most likely serviceable.  They had been sitting in piles in South American warehouses for about 70+ years.  As you got closer to the bottom of the pile, the quality of the rifles got junkier and rustier.  This is one of the last ones.  No stock, no metal shroud.  Pretty worthless.  In fact, you can still get these barreled receivers for approximately $10 at CenterFireSystems.com UPDATE: they only sell M71's now which are in the worst possible condition.  Parts are quite rare for the M71, so don't bother!  Additionally, there are too many moving parts on the M71 compared to the G88 that trying to derustify the M71 is impossible.  The G88 has very few moving parts on the reciever so all you need is a working bolt.

When I received the barreled action, the thing was quite nasty.  It was covered orange with rust.  After applying liberal amounts of machine oil (didn't wanna waste any of that fancy WD40) and scrubbing the hell out of it with metal scouring pads (steel wool) the metal started to turn a dark black. Buffing up pitted spots with more oil + stainless dremel tool, there was some white metal starting to come through that 70 years of rust.  I lopped off the the barrel to the legal minimum of 16.25 inches, scrubbed the bore with a brush wrapped in steel wool (the roughest grade possible), and drowned the entire thing in Casey's Cold Blue.  The stock is just a 2x4 of pine.  I scrawled a half-assed shape that vaguely resembled a rifle stock, carved it out with a hacksaw, carved a rectangular hole inside the stock for where the barreled-action would go, sanded it down, and plashed some red varnish on it.  Hmmm... Pretty hideous!  I used a super hardening epoxy to match the reciever to the wood and let it sit.  After that I wrapped the barrel in some twine just for the hell of it..  Finally, I added a cartridge holder for laughs.  Holy crap, is this thing hideous or what?